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ST. OLAVS

MAY GURNEY

ST. OLAVS

114 unit 13 storey tower located just outside the Canada Water Masterplan and adjacent to the Rotherhithe Tunnel entrance. The site is split by an LVMF of St Pauls which was used as a driver to split the scheme into two separate, angular blocks.

Southwark, London.

St. Olavs is a 114 unit 13 storey tower located just outside the Canada Water Masterplan and adjacent to the Rotherhithe Tunnel entrance. The site is split by an LVMF of St. Pauls which was used as a driver to split the scheme into two separate, angular blocks. This minimised the visual mass of the project whilst maximising the number of dual aspect units provided. In addition to a generous landscape and public realm offering to the north and west of the site, there is a notable ground floor commercial aspect.

The proposed commercial space, which is proposed to include co-working spaces and cafes, will activate the boundary of the site and spill out onto the new 'Creative Courtyard'. The commercial space aims to draw people into the proposal from each edge of the site whilst also acting as a catalyst for achieving future regeneration of the surrounding areas.

(01)  13 STOREY TOWER
(02)  7 STOREY BLOCK
(03)  STEPPED COMMUNAL TERRACE
(04)  PUBLIC SQUARE

The north tower consists of a 17 storey block with the scheme stepping down to 8 storey block to the south, avoiding the  LVMF corridor. In order to provide as much amenity and open space to both residents and the public as possible, the scheme only covers 57% of the site whilst also providing over 90% dual aspect residential units and re-providing all of the existing commercial space currently on the site.

The north tower consists of a 17 storey block with the scheme stepping down to 8 storey block to the south, avoiding the  LVMF corridor. In order to provide as much amenity and open space to both residents and the public as possible, the scheme only covers 57% of the site whilst also providing over 90% dual aspect residential units and re-providing all of the existing commercial space currently on the site.

Stitching the site into its wider context was a clear priority throughout the design process. A podium level established at the same level as the buildings along Albion Street created an extension of the existing shop frontage. Multiple parks are situated adjacent to the site such as Christopher Jones Square, Southwark Park and St. Olavs Square. Creating a new public plaza in the centre of our scheme between the blocks allowed for a new pedestrian link from the Canada Water Masterplan into Southwark Park.

The scheme followed a landscape led approach with further communal amenity for residents  provided at the varying upper levels created by the folded massing. This also ensured that quality outdoor amenity decks were provided to residents. lifting them above traffic and noise pollution. A natural feature of the steps in the massing created uniquely shaped landscaped terraces with individual character areas that are engaging  for the residents to use with amazing views out across London.

Maintain Streetscape – The concept for the urban connection with Albion Street is to anchor the base of the proposal with a podium element which is of a similar scale to the buildings along Albion Street, creating a smooth transition in form. This matches the scale of the buildings situated along Albion Street to help blend the proposal into the wider context and extend the shop frontage of Albion Street further. The roof line of the Albion Street frontage is carried along the proposal and creates a ‘stepping up’ to the roundabout.

Green Links – Christopher Jones Square sits adjacent to the South East of the site which holds significant relevance to the local area of Rotherhithe. To improve the current condition of the park we decided to integrate our proposal into the existing grain and extend the square through multiple new green areas that link Christopher Jones Square to the equally important St. Olav’s Square.

Elevated Parks – The stepping massing allowed spaces to be made for communal amenity. These uniquely shaped spaces create interesting and engaging environments for playspace and parks with amazing views across London elevated up to above eight storeys.